New York Film Locations

 





Three Men and a Baby Revisited

13 April 2015

Hearing the sad news that Leonard Nimoy had recently passed away at the age of 83, otsoNY has decided to pay respect to the legend that was Dr. Spock by revisiting the classic 1987 comedy, Three Men and a baby that he actually directed.

Three Men and a Baby starred Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg, Ted Danson and Nancy Travis. It follows the mishaps and adventures of three bachelors as they attempt to adapt their lives to pseudo-fatherhood with the arrival of the love child of one of them. The script was based on the 1985 French film Trois hommes et un couffin (Three Men and a Cradle). The film was the biggest American box office hit of that year, surpassing Fatal Attraction and eventually grossing US$167 million in the US alone. The movie won the 1988 People's Choice Award for Favourite Comedy Motion Picture.

New film locations as well as higher quality screen grabs will be posted this week for Three Men and a Baby.

Leonard Nimoy


(Leonard Nimoy)

Leonard Nimoy was of course best known for his role as Spock in the Star Trek franchise, however he did have many other talents as a film director, photographer, author, poet, singer and songwriter. He began his career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s, as well as playing the title role in Kid Monk Baroni. Foreshadowing his fame as a semi-alien, he played Narab, one of three Martian invaders in the 1952 movie serial Zombies of the Stratosphere.

In 1965, he made his first appearance in the rejected Star Trek pilot "The Cage", and went on to play the character of Spock until 1969, followed by eight feature films and guest slots in the various spin-off series. The character has had a significant cultural impact and garnered Nimoy three Emmy Award nominations; TV Guide named Spock one of the 50 greatest TV characters. After the original Star Trek series, Nimoy starred in Mission: Impossible for two seasons, hosted the documentary series In Search of..., narrated Civilization IV, and made several well-received stage appearances. He also had a recurring role in the science fiction series Fringe. Nimoy's fame as Spock was such that both of his autobiographies, I Am Not Spock (1975) and I Am Spock (1995), were written from the viewpoint of sharing his existence with the character. Nimoy has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In February 2014, Nimoy revealed publicly that he had been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition he attributed to a smoking habit he had given up about 30 years earlier. On February 19, 2015, having been in and out of hospitals for the past several months, Nimoy was taken to UCLA Medical Center for chest pains. Nimoy died of complications of COPD on February 27, 2015, at the age of 83, in his Bel Air home. Nimoy's remains were buried during a funeral service in Los Angeles on March 1, 2015. The service was attended by nearly 300 family members, friends and former colleagues, including Shatner's daughters, Zachary Quinto, Chris Pine and J. J. Abrams.





 


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