New York Film Locations

 





Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Philip Green (Gregory Peck) is a highly respected writer who is recruited by a national magazine to write a series of articles on anti-Semitism in America. He's not too keen on the series, mostly because he's not sure how to tackle the subject. Then it dawns on him: if he was to pretend to all and sundry that he was Jewish, he could then experience the degree of racism and prejudice that exists and write his story from that perspective. It takes little time for him to experience bigotry. He soon learns the liberal-minded firm he works for doesn't hire Jews and that his own secretary changed her name and kept the fact that she is Jewish a secret from everyone. Green soon finds that he won't be invited to certain parties, that he cannot stay in so-called 'restricted' hotels and that his own son is called names in the street. His anger at the way he is treated also affects his relationship with Kathy Lacy (Dorothy McGuire), his publisher's niece and the person who suggested the series in the first place.


5th Avenue (btw East 59th Street and 60th Streets) Manhattan.
   

5th Avenue (btw East 50th and 51st Streets) Manhattan.
   

Atlas Statue

Atlas is a bronze statue in front of Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan, New York City, across Fifth Avenue from St. Patrick's Cathedral. The sculpture depicts the Ancient Greek Titan Atlas holding the heavens. It was created by sculptor Lee Lawrie with the help of Rene Paul Chambellan, and it was installed in 1937. The sculpture is in the Art Deco style, as is the entire Rockefeller Center. Atlas in the sculpture is 15 feet tall, while the entire statue is 45 feet tall, as high as a four-story building. It weighs seven tons, and is the largest sculpture at Rockefeller Center. The North-South axis of the armillary sphere on his shoulders points towards the North Star as seen from New York City.

When Atlas was unveiled in 1937, some people protested, claiming that it looked like Mussolini. Later, painter James Montgomery Flagg said that Atlas "looks too much as Mussolini thinks he looks". The statue is sometimes associated with the Objectivist movement, in reference to the work Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, although the statue precedes the movement.





 


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