New York Film Locations

 





Port of New York (1949)

Agents Mickey Waters (Scott Brady) and John Flannery (Richard Rober) re-team to investigate the theft of medicinal narcotics from the S.S. Florentine. The vicious gang responsible is headed by the ruthless, but debonair Paul Vicola, who doesn't hesitate to murder anyone who stands in his way. Vicola's girlfriend is garroted when she becomes unreliable, and when go-between nightclub comic Dolly Carney poses a risk, he is thrown from his apartment window. After Waters is shot and killed trying to break into the gang's Brooklyn-based yacht club front, Flannery decides to go undercover and pose as a San Francicco drug dealer. The gang is smoked out and after a furious gun battle, Vicola is apprehended and his gang broken.


Lower Manhattan (btw Hudson River and East River) Manhattan.
   

Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, 1 Bowling Green and Broadway, Manhattan.
   

United States Courthouse, 40 Centre Street and Foley Square, Manhattan.
   

Columbus Circle and Central Park West, Manhattan.
   

Canal Street Station, Canal Street and Broadway, Manhattan.
   

Pennsylvania Station, 8th Avenue and West 34th Street, Manhattan.
   

The Original Pennsylvania Station

Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity train station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. It is one of the busiest rail stations in the world, and a hub for inboard and outboard railroad traffic in New York City. The New York City Subway system also has multiple lines that connect to the station. The station is located in the underground levels of Pennsylvania Plaza, an urban complex located btw 7th Avenue and 8th Avenue and btw 31st Street and 33rd Street in Midtown Manhattan.

Pennsylvania Station is named for the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), its builder and original tenant, and shares its name with several stations in other cities. The current facility is the substantially remodeled underground remnant of a much grander structure designed by McKim, Mead, and White and completed in 1910.

The original Pennsylvania Station was an outstanding masterpiece of the Beaux-Arts style and one of the architectural jewels of New York City. The station's air rights were optioned in the 1950s. The option was executed soon after. The option called for the demolition of the head-house and train shed, to be replaced by an office complex and a new sports complex. The tracks of the station, which were located well below street level, would remain untouched. Demolition began in October 1963. The Pennsylvania Plaza complex, including the fourth and current Madison Square Garden, was completed in 1968.





 


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