New York Film Locations

 





Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary (Mia Farrow) and Guy Woodhouse (John Cassavetes) move into an apartment in a building with a bad reputation. They discover that their neighbours are a very friendly elderly couple named Roman and Minnie Castevet, and Guy begins to spend a lot of time with them. Strange things start to happen: a woman Rosemary meets in the washroom dies a mysterious death, Rosemary has strange dreams and hears strange noises and Guy becomes remote and distant. Then Rosemary falls pregnant and begins to suspect that her neighbours have special plans for her child.


The Dakota, 1 West 72nd Street and Central Park West, Manhattan.
  The Dakota takes the place of the fictional Bramford.  

The Dakota

The Dakota, constructed from October 25, 1880 to October 27, 1884, is an apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in New York City.

The architectural firm of Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel.

The building's high gables and deep roofs with a profusion of dormers, terracotta spandrels and panels, niches, balconies and balustrades give it a North German Renaissance character, an echo of a Hanseatic townhall. Nevertheless, its layout and floor plan betray a strong influence of French architectural trends in housing design that had become known in New York in the 1870s.

According to popular legend, the Dakota was so named because at the time it was built, the Upper West Side of Manhattan was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote as the Dakota Territory. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper story. It is more likely that the building was named "The Dakota" because of Clark's fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. High above the 72nd Street entrance, the figure of a Dakota Indian keeps watch. The Dakota was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

West 72nd Street and Broadway, Manhattan.
   

East 60th Street and 2nd Avenue, Manhattan.
   

Time & Life Building, 1271 6th Avenue and West 50th Street, Manhattan.
   

Tiffany & Co, 727 5th Avenue and East 57th Street, Manhattan.
   

5th Avenue and East 55th Street, Manhattan.
   

810 5th Avenue and East 62nd Street, Manhattan.
   

5th Avenue and East 62nd Street, Manhattan.
  The telephone booth is no longer there.  

650 Park Avenue (btw East 66th and 67th Streets) Manhattan.
   





 


2009-2017 otsoNY.com | Disclaimer | Contact