New York Film Locations

 





Spider-Man (2002)

On a school field trip, Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire) is bitten by a genetically modified spider. He wakes up the next morning with incredible powers. After witnessing the death of his uncle (Cliff Robertson), Parkers decides to put his new skills to use in order to rid the city of evil, but someone else has other plans. The Green Goblin (Willem Dafoe) sees Spider-Man as a threat and must dispose of him. Even if it means the Goblin has to target Parker's Aunt and the girl (Kirsten Dunst) he secretly pines for.


Columbia University, Broadway and West 116th Street, Manhattan.
   

Norman Osborn's Apartment, East 40th Street and 1st Avenue, Manhattan.
   

New York Public Library, 5th Avenue and 42nd Street, Manhattan.
   

The Daily Bugle, 175 5th Avenue (btw 22nd and 23rd Street) Manhattan.
   

The Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building, or Fuller Building as it was originally called, is located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, and is considered to be one of the first skyscrapers ever built. Upon completion in 1902 it was one of the tallest buildings in New York City. The building sits on a triangular island block at 23rd Street, Fifth Avenue, and Broadway, anchoring the south (downtown) end of Madison Square. The neighbourhood around the building is called the Flatiron District after its signature building.

Rockefeller Roof Gardens, 5th Avenue (btw 49th and 50th Streets) Manhattan.
  Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres btw 48th and 51st streets.

Website: Official Rockefeller website
 

Rockefeller Roof Gardens

The five roof gardens perched atop the 7th floor of Rockefeller Center have been in existence since the mid 1930's and continue to provide beautiful greenspace as well as visual ammenity for the surrounding skyscrapers. The Rockefeller Center roof gardens were constructed btw 1933 and 1936. Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres btw 48th and 51st Streets in New York. Built by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning btw Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987. Three of Rockefeller Center's secluded roof gardens can be viewed from the Top of the Rock observation decks, atop the GE Building, where panoramic views of Central Park and the Empire State Building can also be seen.

Roosevelt Island Tramway (connects Roosevelt Island to Manhattan).
   

Roosevelt Island Tramway

The Roosevelt Island Tramway is an aerial tramway in New York City that spans the East River and connects Roosevelt Island to Manhattan. Prior to the completion of the Mississippi Aerial River Transit in May 1984 and the Portland Aerial Tram in December 2006, it was the only commuter aerial tramway in North America. Over 26 million passengers have used the tram since it began operation in 1976. Each cabin has a capacity of up to 125 people and makes approximately 115 trips per day. The tram moves at about 16 mph (26 km/h) and travels 3,100 feet (940 m) in 4.5 minutes. At its peak it climbs to 250 feet (76 m) above the East River as it follows its route on the north side of the Queensboro Bridge, providing views of the East Side of midtown Manhattan. Two cabins make the run at fifteen minute intervals from 6:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. (3:30 a.m. on weekends) and continuously during rush hours. It is one of the few forms of mass transit in New York City not run by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, but uses that system's MetroCard.





 


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