New York Film Locations

 





The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996)

Rose (Barbra Streisand) and Gregory (Jeff Bridges), both Columbia University professors meet when Rose's sister answers Gregory's "personals" ad. Several times burned, the handsome-but-boring Gregory believes that sex has ruined his life, and has deliberately set out to find and marry a woman with absolutely no sex appeal. Greg thinks he's found what he's looking for in Rose, a plain, plump English Lit professor who can't compete with her gorgeous mother and sister. More out of mutual admiration and respect than love, Greg and Rose marry. Greg assumes that Rose understands that he is not interested in a sexual relationship. He's mistaken, and their marriage is nearly destroyed when Rose tries to consummate their relationship. While Gregory is out of the country on a lecture tour, Rose diets and exercises to transform herself into a sexy siren in a last-ditch attempt to save her marriage.


Columbia University, Broadway and 116th Street, Manhattan.
   

otsoNY Comments: Although the number for Rose's apartment is shown as 404, the building on West End Avenue is in fact number 505.

Rose's Apartment, 505 West End Avenue and Edgar Allen Poe Street, Manhattan.
   

Tavern on the Green (btw West 66th and 67th Street) Manhattan.
   

Monkey Bar, 60 East 54th Street and Madison Avenue, Manhattan.
   

Alice in Wonderland, Central Park (East 74th Street) Manhattan.
   

Conservatory Water Central Park, (from 72nd to 75th Street) Manhattan.
  Inspired by the model boat ponds of late 19th century Paris, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux created a place where children and adults alike could experience the pleasure of boating, in addition to the other attractions Conservatory Water has to offer.  

Bow Bridge (Mid-Park at 74th Street) Central Park, Manhattan.
   

Bow Bridge

Bow Bridge is one of the most photographed and filmed locations in Central Park and it deserves every bit of its star reputation. Stretching sixty feet over the lake, from Cherry Hill to the Ramble, it is not only one of the most beautiful cast iron bridges in the world, but also offers some of the most breathtaking views of the park around it.

Completed in 1862 Bow Bridge was built of cast iron instead of stone, which was used for almost all of the other archways in the park. While this was ostensibly done for economic reasons (eliminating the need for stone cutters and masons) it is impossible now to imagine how it could have been executed in any other manner. From its graceful curves to the subtle ornamentation it is one of the finest examples of the magic that resulted from the combined vision of Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mould. It displays an understated, yet powerful aesthetic that provides the perfect transition btw the carefully crafted Cherry Hill and the natural jumble of the Ramble.

The bridge also provides the perfect perch from which to watch the slowly moving row boats as they glide across the lake, or to photograph the skyline over Fifth Ave. as it rises from the leafy skirt of trees that edge it. It is one of the most popular, and best known, spots to meet and has hosted numberless romantic moments, both on and off the big screen. In fact, if you edited them together, you could probably construct an entire Woody Allen feature just from the scenes filmed on Bow Bridge. And despite rumors to the contrary the bridge has always been very easy to work with and has nothing but admiration and respect for the celebrated director.





 


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