New York Film Locations

 





The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984)

The Muppets graduate from college and decide to take their senior revue on the road. They hit the streets of Manhattan trying to sell their show to producers, finally finding one young and idealistic enough to take their show. After several mishaps and much confusion, things begin to come together for them.


Empire State Building, 350 5th Avenue and West 34th Street, Manhattan.
  The Empire State Building is a 102-story landmark Art Deco skyscraper at the intersection of 5th Avenue and West 34th Street. It is 1,250 ft (381 meters) tall.  

Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is a 102-story landmark Art Deco skyscraper in New York City at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Its name is derived from the nickname for the state of New York. It stood as the world's tallest building for more than forty years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center's North Tower was completed in 1972. Following the destruction of the World Trade Center in 2001, the Empire State Building once again became the tallest building in New York City and New York State.

The Empire State Building has been named by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. In 2007, it was ranked number one on the List of America's Favourite Architecture according to the AIA. The building is owned and managed by W&H Properties.

The Empire State Building is the third tallest skyscraper in the Americas (after two Chicago towers the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower) and the 15th tallest in the world. It is also the 4th tallest freestanding structure in the Americas. The Empire State building is currently undergoing a $120 million renovation in an effort to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure. The building's opening coincided with the Great Depression in the United States, and as a result much of its office space went without being rented. The building's vacancy was exacerbated by its poor location on 34th Street, which placed it relatively far from public transportation, as Grand Central Terminal, the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and Penn Station are all several blocks away. Other more successful skyscrapers, such as the Chrysler Building, do not have this problem. In its first year of operation, the observation deck took in approximately 2 million dollars, as much money as its owners made in rent that year. The lack of renters led New Yorkers to deride the building as the "Empty State Building". The building would not become profitable until 1950. The famous 1951 sale of The Empire State Building to Roger L. Stevens and his business partners was brokered by the prominent upper Manhattan real-estate firm Charles F. Noyes & Company for a record $51 million. At the time, that was the highest price ever paid for a single structure in real-estate history.

Pulitzer Fountain, West 58th Street and Grand Army Plaza, Manhattan.
   

Sardi's Restaurant, 234 West 44th Street and 7th Avenue, Manhattan.
   

Cherry Hill, Central Park, Manhattan.
   

Conservatory Water Central Park, (from 72nd to 75th Street) Manhattan.
  Inspired by the model boat ponds of late 19th century Paris, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux created a place where children and adults alike could experience the pleasure of boating, in addition to the other attractions Conservatory Water has to offer.  





 


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