New York Film Locations

 





The Producers (2005)

New York, 1959. Max Bialystock (Nathan Lane) was once the king of Broadway, but now all his shows close on opening night. Things turn around when he's visited by the neurotic accountant Leo Bloom (Matthew Broderick), who proposes a scheme tailor-made for producers who can only make flops: raise far more money than you need, then make sure the show is despised. No one will be interested in it, so you can pocket the surplus. To this end, they produce a musical called Springtime for Hitler written by escaped Nazi Franz Liebken. Then they get the insanely flamboyant Roger De Bris to direct. Finally, they hire as a lead actress the loopy Swedish bombshell Ulla (Uma Thurman). As opening night draws near, what can go wrong? Well, there's no accounting for taste.


otsoNY Comments: Originally, this was almost shot in Toronto, Canada. New York State tax incentives made it possible for the production to film in New York City at the new Steiner Studios in Brooklyn. Producer Mel Brooks also jokingly complained that the bagels in Toronto were "too mushy".

Bethesda Terrace, (Mid-Park at 72nd Street) Central Park, Manhattan.
  Bethesda Terrace has two levels. The upper terrace flanks the 72nd Street Cross Drive and the lower terrace provides a podium for viewing the Lake. The fountain is the central feature on the lower level of the terrace.  

953 - 955, 5th Avenue (btw East 76th and 77th Street) Manhattan.
   

The Mall, Central Park, Manhattan.
  A walkway leading to the beautiful Bethesda Terrace, the Central Park Mall runs through the middle of the Park from 66th to 72nd street. It remains the sole formal feature of Olmsted and Vaux's naturalistic creation.  

The Plaza Hotel, 750 5th Avenue and Central Park South, Manhattan.
  The Plaza Hotel in New York City is a landmark 20-story luxury hotel that occupies the west side of Grand Army Plaza, from which it derives its name.

Website: Official Plaza Hotel website
 

5th Avenue (btw East 50th and 51st Streets) Manhattan.
   

Atlas Statue

Atlas is a bronze statue in front of Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan, New York City, across Fifth Avenue from St. Patrick's Cathedral. The sculpture depicts the Ancient Greek Titan Atlas holding the heavens. It was created by sculptor Lee Lawrie with the help of Rene Paul Chambellan, and it was installed in 1937. The sculpture is in the Art Deco style, as is the entire Rockefeller Center. Atlas in the sculpture is 15 feet tall, while the entire statue is 45 feet tall, as high as a four-story building. It weighs seven tons, and is the largest sculpture at Rockefeller Center. The North-South axis of the armillary sphere on his shoulders points towards the North Star as seen from New York City.

When Atlas was unveiled in 1937, some people protested, claiming that it looked like Mussolini. Later, painter James Montgomery Flagg said that Atlas "looks too much as Mussolini thinks he looks". The statue is sometimes associated with the Objectivist movement, in reference to the work Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, although the statue precedes the movement.





 


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